No. 6 Mega-moves of Mega-fauna

The Botswana Rhino Conservation Project

Why do we believe?

  • Since 1999, we have stuck resolutely to our target of species restoration and have managed to spearhead a wide-ranging partnership and coalition of governments, conservation organisations, private donors and myriad other entities.
  • With our partners, we have successfully established healthy breeding populations of both black and white rhino in the Okavango Delta.
  • Botswana is now a continently-significant range state for both species and plays an increasingly important role in their conservation.

When we first started business in Botswana in 1983, white rhino numbers had plummeted. By the early 1990s, both black and white rhino were locally extinct.

Our first relocations of white and black rhino in 2001 set the ball rolling towards a very healthy resident population and the culmination – in 2014/15 – of the largest-ever cross-border relocation of black rhino … fully 1% of Africa’s total population.

The project certainly did not end with the reintroduction of the rhino; every day, our rhino monitoring teams continue their vital work to help pull this species back from the brink of extinction.

No. 6 Mega-moves of Mega-fauna

The Botswana Rhino Conservation Project

We helped restore locally-extinct black and white rhino to the wild in Botswana in the largest cross-border move ever completed

Why do we believe?

  • Since 1999, we have stuck resolutely to our target of species restoration and have managed to spearhead a wide-ranging partnership and coalition of governments, conservation organisations, private donors and myriad other entities.
  • With our partners, we have successfully established healthy breeding populations of both black and white rhino in the Okavango Delta.
  • Botswana is now a continently-signifi cant range state for both species and plays an increasingly important role in their conservation.

When we first started business in Botswana in 1983, white rhino numbers had plummeted. By the early 1990s, both black and white rhino were locally extinct.

Our first relocations of white and black rhino in 2001 set the ball rolling towards a very healthy resident population and the culmination – in 2014/15 – of the largest-ever cross-border relocation of black rhino … fully 1% of Africa’s total population.

The project certainly did not end with the reintroduction of the rhino; every day, our rhino monitoring teams continue their vital work to help pull this species back from the brink of extinction.